How two guys in New Jersey created the most desirable equalizer: Pultec EQP-1A

Pultec is the holy grail when it comes to equalizers.  But, the reason why Pultec is so great can seem elusive. If you asked someone why, their answer would be solely their opinion. You could attribute their success to the transformers, the tubes, the Q curves or being a byproduct of the times, the place or the people. But really, it was all those things that created the perfect storm for genius. The fact that it’s still one of, if not the most, sought after audio equalizers ever made is even further testament to that.

Pultecs will always hold a special place in my heart. If I had to list of things that are most important to me it would go my family, Pultec EQP-1A equalizers and then my girlfriend… Okay… Maybe it’s not that extreme but I really do love the things. In my sophomore year of college, I started interning at Sabella Studios, in Long Island, New York. The first time I walked in, I immediately noticed the rack of 9 foreign looking blue boxes taking up the whole wall. I’d never heard of a Pultec, I’d never even seen an equalizer that looked like that, and I certainly didn’t know what made them or the fact that there was a whole wall of them so special. The more I got to use them the more I grew to love them and started to understand what a privilege it was just to even use one let alone a wall of 9 of them.

If you took a trip to Teaneck, New Jersey in 1955, you just might run into Gene Shenk and his longtime friend, Ollie Summerlin, tweaking what would become one of the first Pultec EQP-1 equalizers. Gene and Ollie… they were Pultec, the whole operation was never more than 3 people and the majority of the time they were responsible from everything including engineering, designing, marketing and producing each and every piece of gear by hand. These two guys in New Jersey left their mark on the recording industry forever and not many people even know their name. You can’t go into a recording studio without seeing an original Pultec or a clone of an original or a plugin emulating one.

Ollie and Gene met studying electronics at the RCA Institute (now the Technical Career Institute College of Technology) in NYC. After school, Gene spent 14 years working for RCA while Ollie enlisted in the Navy. After WW2, Ollie ended up at Capitol Records as an engineer and sold Ampex tape machines before meeting back up with Shenk to form Pulse Techniques. Pulse techniques was the formal name for the company that produced the Pultec EQP-1A.

Starting in 1953, the two man team of Ollie and Gene made every single item, to order, by hand… When people say, “they just don’t make them like they used to…,” they are right. They really don’t make them like they used to. You couldn’t make an equalizer today with the same components as an original. Even if you did have an unlimited amount of money, there are components that are no longer available. Many people claim the transformers on the input and output are the reason for much of the magical powers of the unit. This point is emphasized when you just run audio through the unit in bypass. You can hear the difference even with no EQ engaged.

Listen to these samples — the first is a dry vocal track with no Pultec, the second is the same vocal track being run through a Pultec but with the bypass engaged.

Dry Vocal

 

Bypassed Pultec Vocal

 

The company first started out making variable filament supplies for tubes and stepped oscillators. In 1956, the first version of their equalizer, the EQP-1, was seen in the Pultec catalog. They were advertised to the broadcast industry and the main unique feature and selling point was the tube make up gain which allowed it to be engaged without the signal dropping in level.

In 1961, the EQP-1 was replaced by the updated EQP-1A which had added frequency selections. The new 1A model had added a 20 hz boost and attenuation, 16 khz boost, and a 5, 10 and 20 kHz attenuation. In 1981, Shenk was finally ready to retire. He tried, unsuccessfully, to sell the company and eventually ceased production and shut the doors for good.

A common myth is that the Pultec passive circuit designs were licensed from Western Electric. This is not true, the manual does state, “licensed under patents of the Western Electric Company,” but that is only for the use of negative feedback and has nothing to do with any of the actual circuit designs.

David Silverstein

David Silverstein began engineering at the age of 14 when he purchased a Fostex four track cassette recorder. After high school he enrolled at Five Towns College where he graduated with a Bachelors of Professional Studies in Business with a concentration in Audio Recording Technology. He has worked under renowned engineers and producers Jim Sabella (Marcy Playground, Nine Days, and Public Enemy) and Bryce Goggin (Pavement, Spacehog, The Ramones and The Lemonheads).

David currently works out of Sabella Studios in Roslyn, NY.